University of Wisconsin–Madison

Publications

  • Books

    Norton, A. & Alibali, M. W. (Eds). (in preparation). Constructing number: Merging perspectives from psychology and mathematics education. Springer.

    Siegler, R. S. & Alibali, M. W. (in preparation). Children’s thinking (5th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

    Church, R. B., Alibali, M. W. & Kelly, S. D. (Eds). (2017). Why gesture? How the hands function in speaking, thinking, and communicating. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

    Siegler, R. S. & Alibali, M. W. (2005). Children’s thinking (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

  • Journal articles and book chapters

    Alibali, M. W. & Nathan, M. J. (in press). Embodied cognition in learning and teaching: Action, observation, and imagination. In F. Fischer, S. Goldman, C. Hmelo-Silver & P. Riemann (Eds.), International Handbook of the Learning Sciences. New York, NY: Routledge/ Taylor & Francis.

    Gutiérrez, J. F., Brown, S. A., & Alibali, M. W. (2018). Relational equity and mathematics learning: Mutual construction during peer collaboration in problem solving. Journal of Numerical Cognition, 4(1), in press.

    Alibali, M. W. & Knuth, E. J. (2018). Bridging psychology and mathematics education: Reflections on boundary crossing. Journal of Numerical Cognition, 4(1), in press.

    Yeo, A. & Alibali, M. W. (2018). Does the visual salience of action influence gesture production? Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory & Cognition, in press.

    Cooper, J. L., Sidney, P. G., & Alibali, M. W. (2018). Who benefits from diagrams and illustrations in math problems? Ability and attitudes matter. Applied Cognitive Psychology. doi: 10.1002/acp.3371.[pdf]

    Alibali, M. W., Crooks, N. M., & McNeil, N. M. (2017). Perceptual support promotes strategy generation: Evidence from mathematical equivalence. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, doi:10.1111/bjdp.12203.[pdf]

    Riggs, A. E., Alibali, M. W., & Kalish, C. W. (2017). Does it matter how Molly does it? Person-presentation of strategies and transfer in mathematics. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 51, 315-320.[pdf]

    Fyfe, E., Evans, J. L., Matz, L. E., Hunt, K., & Alibali, M. W. (2017). Patterning skill relates to some, but not all, aspects of developing mathematics knowledge. Cognitive Development, 44, 1-11.[pdf]

    Yeo, A., Church, R. B., Ledesma, I., Nathan, M. J., & Alibali, M. W. (2017). Teachers’ gestures and students’ learning: Sometimes “hands off” is better. Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications, 2(1), 41.[pdf]

    Sidney, P. G. & Alibali, M. W. (2017). Creating a context for learning: Activating children’s whole number knowledge prepares them to understand fraction division. Journal of Numerical Cognition, 3(1), 31–57. doi:10.5964/jnc.v3i1.71[pdf]

    Kita, S., Alibali, M. W., & Chu, M. (2017). How do gestures influence thinking and speaking? The Gesture for Conceptualization hypothesis. Psychological Review, 124(3), 245-266. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/rev0000059[pdf]

    Nathan, M. J., Wolfgram, M. S., Srisurichan, R., Walkington, C., & Alibali, M. W. (2017). Threading mathematics through symbols, sketches, software, silicone and wood: Tailoring high school STEM instruction. Journal of Educational Research, 110(3), 272-293. DOI: 10.1080/00220671.2017.1287046[pdf]

    Williams-Pierce, C., Pier, E., Walkington, C., Boncoddo, R., Clinton, V., Alibali, M. W., & Nathan, M. J. (2017). What we say and how we do: Action, gesture, and language in proving. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 48(3), 248-260.[pdf]

    Kelly, S. D., Church, R. B., & Alibali, M. W. (2017). Understanding gesture: Description, mechanism, function. In R. B. Church, M. W. Alibali, & S. D. Kelly (Eds), Why gesture? How the hands function in speaking, thinking, and communicating (pp. 3-10). Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

    Alibali, M. W. Yeo, A., Hostetter, A. B., & Kita, S. (2017). Representational gestures help speakers package information for speaking. In R. B. Church, M. W. Alibali, & S. D. Kelly (Eds), Why gesture? How the hands function in speaking, thinking, and communicating (pp. 15-37). Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

    Nathan, M. J., Alibali, M. W., & Church, R. B. (2017). Making and breaking common ground: How teachers use gesture and speech to foster learning in the classroom. In R. B. Church, M. W. Alibali, & S. D. Kelly (Eds), Why gesture? How the hands function in speaking, thinking, and communicating (pp. 285-316). Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

    Clinton, V., Cooper, J. L., Michaelis, J., Alibali, M. W., & Nathan, M. J. (2017). Revising visuals based on instructional design principles: Effects on cognitive load and learning. In C. Was, F. J. Sansosti, & B. J. Morris (Eds.). Eye-tracking technology applications in educational research (pp. 195-218). Hershey, PA: IGI Global.

    Saffran, A., Barchfeld, P., Sodian, B., & Alibali, M. W. (2016). Children’s and adults’ interpretation of covariation data: Does symmetry of variables matter? Developmental Psychology, 52(10), 1530-1544. doi: 10.1037/dev0000203[pdf]

    Clinton, V., Morsanyi, K., Alibali, M. W., & Nathan, M. J. (2016). Learning about probability from text and tables: Do color coding and labeling help? Applied Cognitive Psychology, 30(3), 440-453.[pdf]

    Sanjeevan, T., Mainela-Arnold, E., Alibali, M. W., & Evans, J. (2016). The temporal relationship between speech and manual communicative gesture in children with Specific Language Impairment. Gesture, 15(3), 321–339. doi: 10.1075/gest.15.3.03san

    Koumoustakis, T., Church, R. B., Alibali, M. W., Singer, M., & Ayman-Nolley, S. (2016). Gesture in instruction: Evidence from live and video lessons. Journal of Nonverbal Behavior, 40(4), 301-315.[pdf]

    Clinton, V., Alibali, M. W., & Nathan, M. J. (2016). Learning about posterior probability: Do diagrams and elaborative interrogations help? Journal of Experimental Education, 84, 579-599. doi: 10.1080/00220973.2015.1048847[pdf]

    Hattikudur, S., Sidney, P. G., & Alibali, M. W. (2016). Does comparing informal and formal procedures promote mathematics learning? The benefits of bridging depend on attitudes towards mathematics. Journal of Problem Solving, 9(1), 13-27.[pdf]

    Sidney, P. G., Hattikudur, S., & Alibali, M. W. (2015). How do contrasting cases and self-explanation promote learning? Evidence from fraction division. Learning & Instruction, 40, 29-38.[pdf]

    Alibali, M. W. & Sidney, P. G. (2015). Variability in the natural number bias: Who, when, how, and why? [Commentary on papers in the Special Issue: Mind the Gap!]. Learning & Instruction, 37, 56-61. doi:10.1016/j.learninstruc.2015.01.003[pdf]

    Riggs, A. E., Alibali, M. W., & Kalish, C. W. (2015). Leave her out of it: Person-presentation of strategies is harmful for transfer. Cognitive Science, 39(8), 1965-1978. doi: 10.1111/cogs.12224[pdf]

    Sidney, P. G. & Alibali, M. W. (2015). Making connections in math: Activating a prior knowledge analogue matters for learning. Journal of Cognition & Development, 16, 160-185. doi: 10.1080/15248372.2013.792091[pdf]

    Alibali, M. W. & Sidney, P. G. (2015). The role of intraindividual variability in learning in childhood and adolescence. In M. Diehl, K. Hooker & M. Sliwinski (Eds.), Handbook of Intraindividual Variability Across the Lifespan (pp. 84-102). New York: Routledge.

    Crooks, N. M. & Alibali, M. W. (2014). Defining and measuring conceptual knowledge of mathematics. Developmental Review, 34, 344–377. doi: 10.1016/j.dr.2014.10.001 [pdf]

    Alibali, M. A., Stephens, A. C., Brown, A. N., Kao, Y. S., & Nathan, M. J. (2014). Middle school students’ conceptual understanding of equations: Evidence from writing story problems. International Journal of Educational Psychology, 3(3), 235-264. doi: 10.4471/ijep.2014.13[pdf]

    Nathan, M. J., Walkington, C. A., Boncoddo, R., Pier, E. A., Williams, C., & Alibali, M. W. (2014). Actions speak louder with words: The role of actions and pedagogical language for grounding mathematical reasoning. Learning & Instruction, 33, 182-193. doi: 10.1016/j.learninstruc.2014.07.001[pdf]

    Mainela-Arnold, E., Alibali, M. W., Hostetter, A. B., & & Evans, J. L. (2014). Gesture-speech integration in children with Specific Language Impairment. International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 49(6), 761–770. doi: 10.1111/1460-6984.12115[pdf]

    Riggs, A. E., Kalish, C. K., & Alibali, M. W. (2014a). When you’ve seen one have you seen them all? Children’s memory for general and specific learning episodes. Developmental Psychology, 50(6),1653-1659. doi: 10.1037/a0036130[pdf]

    Jiang, M. J., Cooper, J. L., & Alibali, M. W. (2014). Spatial factors influence arithmetic performance: The case of the minus sign. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 67(8), 1626-1642. doi:10.1080/17470218.2014.898669[pdf]

    Riggs, A. E., Kalish, C. K., & Alibali, M. W. (2014b). Property content guides children’s memory for social learning episodes. Cognition, 131(2), 243–253. doi: 10.1016/j.cognition.2014.01.004[pdf]

    Alibali, M. W. (2014). Gestures and cognitive development. In C. Mueller, A. Cienki, E. Fricke, S. H. Ladewig, D. McNeill, & J. Bressem (Eds.), Body, Language, Communication: An International Handbook on Multimodality in Human Interaction (pp. 1833-1840). Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton.

    Alibali, M. W., Boncoddo, R., & Hostetter, A. B. (2014). The role of gesture in reasoning and problem solving. In L. Shapiro (Ed.), Routledge Handbook of Embodied Cognition (pp. 150-159). New York, NY: Routledge.

    Alibali, M. W., Church, R. B., Kita, S., & Hostetter, A. B. (2014). Embodied knowledge in the development of conservation of quantity: Evidence from gesture. In L. Edwards, F. Ferrara, & D. Moore-Russo (Eds.), Emerging Perspectives on Gesture and Embodiment in Mathematics. International Perspectives on Mathematics Education – Cognition, Equity & Society series. Information Age Press.

    Alibali, M. W., Nathan, M. J., Wolfgram, M. S., Church, R. B., Johnson, C. V., Jacobs, S. A., & Knuth, E. J. (2014). How teachers link ideas in mathematics instruction using speech and gesture: A corpus analysis. Cognition and Instruction, 32(1), 65-100. doi: 10.1080/07370008.2013.858161[pdf]

    Walkington, C. A., Nathan, M. J., Wolfgram, M. S., Alibali, M. W., & Srisurichan, R. (2014). Bridges & barriers to constructing conceptual cohesion across modalities and temporalities: Challenges of STEM integration in the precollege engineering classroom. In J. Strobel, S. Purzer, & M. Cardella (Eds.), Engineering in Pre-College Settings: Research into Practice (pp. 183-210). West Lafayette, IN: Purdue University Press.[pdf]

    Alibali, M. W., Young, A. G., Crooks, N. M., Yeo, A., Ledesma, I., Nathan, M. J., Church, R. B., & Knuth, E. J. (2013). Students learn more when their teacher has learned to gesture effectively. Gesture, 13(2), 210–233.[pdf]

    Crooks, N. M. & Alibali, M. W. (2013). Noticing relevant problem features: Activating prior knowledge affects problem solving by guiding encoding. Frontiers in Educational Psychology, 4:884. doi:10.3389/fpsyg2013.00884[pdf]

    Goldin-Meadow, S. & Alibali, M. W. (2013). Gesture’s role in development and learning. In P. D. Zelazo (Ed.), Oxford Handbook of Developmental Psychology (pp. 953-973). New York: Oxford University Press.

    Alibali, M. W., Nathan, M. J., Church, R. B., Wolfgram, M. S., Kim, S., & Knuth, E. J. (2013). Gesture and speech in mathematics lessons: Forging common ground by resolving trouble spots. ZDM – International Journal on Mathematics Education, 45, 425-440. doi: 10.1007/s11858-012-0476-0.[pdf]

    Nathan, M. J., Srisurichan, R., Walkington, C., Wolfgram, M. S., Williams, C., & Alibali, M. W. (2013). Building cohesion across representations: A mechanism for STEM integration. Journal of Engineering Education, 102(1), 77–116.[pdf]

    Goldin-Meadow, S. & Alibali, M. W. (2013). Gesture’s role in speaking, learning, and creating language. Annual Review of Psychology, 64, 8.1–8.27. doi: 10.1146/annurev-psych-113011-143802  (e-pub posted 7/25/2012).[pdf]

    Young, A. G., Alibali, M. W., & Kalish, C. W. (2012). Disagreement and causal learning: Others’ hypotheses affect children’s evaluations of evidence. Developmental Psychology, 48, 1242-1253.[pdf]

    Hostetter, A. B., Alibali, M. W., & Niedenthal, P. (2012). Embodied social thought: Linking social concepts, emotion, and gesture. In S. T. Fiske & C. N. Macrae (Eds.) In S. Fiske, & C. Macrae (Eds.), The SAGE handbook of social cognition. (pp. 211-229). London: SAGE Publications Ltd. doi: 10.4135/9781446247631.n11

    Hattikudur, S., Prather, R. W., Asquith, P., Alibali, M. W., Knuth, E. J., & Nathan, M. J. (2012). Constructing graphical representations: Middle schoolers’ intuitions and developing knowledge about slope and intercept. School Science and Mathematics, 112(4), 230-240.[pdf]

    Alibali, M. W. & Nathan, M. J. (2012). Embodiment in mathematics teaching and learning: Evidence from students’ and teachers’ gestures. Journal of the Learning Sciences, 21, 247-286. doi: 10.1080/10508406.2011.611446[pdf]

    Alibali, M. W., Spencer, R. C., Knox, L., & Kita, S. (2011). Spontaneous gestures influence strategy choices in problem solving. Psychological Science, 22, 1138–1144. doi: 10.1177/0956797611417722.[pdf]

    Hostetter, A. B. & Alibali, M. W. (2011). Cognitive skills and gesture-speech redundancy: Formulation difficulty or communicative strategy? Gesture, 11(1), 40–60. doi 10.1075/gest.11.1.03hos[pdf]

    Prather, R. W. & Alibali, M. W. (2011). Children’s acquisition of arithmetic principles: The role of experience. Journal of Cognition and Development, 12(3), 332-354. doi: 10.1080/15248372.2010.542214.[pdf]

    Hostetter, A. B., Alibali, M. W., & Shrager, S. M. (2011). If you don’t already know, I’m certainly not going to show you! Motivation to communicate affects gesture production. In G. Stam & M. Ishino (Eds.), Integrating gestures: The interdisciplinary nature of gesture (pp. 61-74). Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

    Nathan, M. J. & Alibali, M. W. (2011). How gesture use enables intersubjectivity in the classroom. In G. Stam & M. Ishino (Eds.), Integrating gestures: The interdisciplinary nature of gesture (pp. 257-266). Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

    Alibali, M. W., Nathan, M. J., & Fujimori, Y. (2011). Gestures in the mathematics classroom: What’s the point? In N. L. Stein & S. W. Raudenbush (Eds.), Developmental cognitive science goes to school (pp. 219-234). New York: Routledge, Taylor & Francis.

    Mainela-Arnold, E., Alibali, M. W., Ryan, K., & Evans, J. L. (2011). Knowledge of mathematical equivalence in children with specific language impairment: Insights from gesture and speech.  Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, 42, 18-30. doi: 10.1044/0161-1461(2010/09-0070)[pdf]

    Alibali, M. W. & Nathan, M. J. (2010). Conducting research in schools: A practical guide. Journal of Cognition and Development, 11(4), 397-407. doi: 10.1080/15248372.2010.516417[pdf]

    Alibali, M. W. & Kita, S. (2010). Gesture highlights perceptually present information for speakers. Gesture, 10(1), 3-28. doi: 10.1075/gest.10.1.02ali[pdf]

    Nathan, M. J. & Alibali, M. W. (2010). Learning Sciences. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews-Cognitive Science, 1(3), 329-345. doi: 10.1002/wcs.54.wz

    McNeil, N. M., Weinberg, A. Stephens, A. C., Hattikudur, S., Asquith, P., Knuth, E. J., & Alibali, M. W. (2010). A is for Apple: Mnemonic symbols hinder students’ interpretations of algebraic expressions. Journal of Educational Psychology, 102(3), 625-634. doi: 10.1037/a0019105[pdf]

    Hattikudur, S. & Alibali, M. W. (2010). Learning about the equal sign: Does contrasting with inequality symbols help? Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 107(1), 15-30. doi: 10.1016/j.jecp.2010.03.004[pdf]

    Hostetter, A. B. & Alibali, M. W. (2010). Language, gesture, action! A test of the Gesture as Simulated Action framework. Journal of Memory and Language, 63, 245-257. doi:10.1016/j.jml.2010.04.003[pdf]

    Alibali, M. W., Evans, J. L., Hostetter, A. B., Ryan, K., & Mainela-Arnold, E. (2009). Gesture-speech integration in narrative discourse: Are children less redundant than adults? Gesture, 9, 290-311.[pdf]

    Prather, R. W. & Alibali, M. W. (2009). Development of arithmetic principle knowledge: How do we know what learners know? Developmental Review, 29, 221-248. doi: 10.1016/j.dr.2009.09.001[pdf]

    Alibali, M. W., Phillips, K. M. O., & Fischer, A. D. (2009). Learning new problem-solving strategies leads to changes in problem representation. Cognitive Development, 24, 89-101.[pdf]

    Hostetter, A. B. & Alibali, M. W. (2008). Visible embodiment: Gestures as simulated action. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review, 15, 495-514.[pdf]

    Knuth, E. J., Alibali, M. W., Hattikudur, S., McNeil, N. M., & Stephens, A. C. (2008). The importance of equal sign understanding in the middle grades. Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, 13, 514-519. (Note: This is a journal for practicing teachers.)[pdf]

    Prather, R. W. & Alibali, M. W. (2008). Understanding and using principles of arithmetic: Operations involving negative numbers. Cognitive Science, 32, 445-457.[pdf]

    Koedinger, K. R., Alibali, M. W., & Nathan, M. J. (2008). Trade-offs between grounded and abstract representations: Evidence from algebra problem solving. Cognitive Science, 32, 366-397.[pdf]

    Kita, S. & Alibali, M. W. (2007). Role of gesture in speaking and thinking: Insights from Piagetian conservation tasks. In T. Sakamoto (Ed.), Communicating skills of intention (pp. 121-129). Tokyo: Hitsuzi Shyobo.

    Graf Estes, K., Evans, J. L., Alibali, M. W., & Saffran, J. R. (2007). Can infants map meaning to newly segmented words? Statistical segmentation and word learning. Psychological Science, 18, 254-260.[pdf]

    Alibali, M. W., Knuth, E. J., Hattikudur, S., McNeil, N. M., & Stephens, A. C. (2007). A longitudinal look at middle-school students’ understanding of the equal sign and equivalent equations. Mathematical Thinking and Learning, 9, 221-247.[pdf]

    Asquith, P. S., Stephens, A. C., Knuth, E. J., & Alibali, M. W. (2007). Middle-school mathematics teachers’ knowledge of students’ understanding of core algebraic concepts: Equal sign and variable. Mathematical Thinking and Learning, 9, 247-270.[pdf]

    Hostetter, A. B. & Alibali, M. W. (2007). Raise your hand if you’re spatial: Relations between verbal and spatial skills and gesture production. Gesture, 7, 73-95.[pdf]

    Hostetter, A. B., Alibali, M. W., & Kita, S. (2007). I see it in my hands’ eye: Representational gestures reflect conceptual demands. Language & Cognitive Processes, 22, 313-336.[pdf]

    Alibali, M. W. & Nathan, M. J. (2007). Teachers’ gestures as a means of scaffolding students’ understanding: Evidence from an early algebra lesson. In R. Goldman, R. Pea, B. Barron, & S. J. Derry (Eds.), Video Research in the Learning Sciences (pp. 349-365). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

    Mainela-Arnold, E., Evans, J. L., & Alibali, M. W. (2006). Understanding conservation delays in children with Specific Language Impairment: Task representations revealed in speech and gesture. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 49, 1267-1279.[pdf]

    Hyde, J. S., Else-Quest, N. M., Alibali, M. W., Knuth, E. J., & Romberg, T. (2006). Mother-child interactions doing mathematics. Journal of Mathematical Behavior, 25, 136-152.[pdf]

    McNeil, N. M., Grandau, L., Knuth, E. J., Alibali, M. W., Stephens, A. C., Hattikudur, S., & Krill, D. E. (2006). Middle-school students’ understanding of the equal sign: The books they read can’t help. Cognition & Instruction, 24, 367-285.[pdf]

    Knuth, E. J., Stephens, A. C., McNeil, N. M., & Alibali, M. W. (2006). Does understanding the equal sign matter? Evidence from solving equations. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 37, 297-312.[pdf]

    Alibali, M. W. (2005b). Gesture in spatial cognition: Expressing, communicating and thinking about spatial information. Spatial Cognition & Computation, 5, 307-331.[pdf]

    Alibali, M. W. (2005a). Mechanisms of change in the development of mathematical reasoning. In R. Kail (Ed.), Advances in Child Development & Behavior (Vol. 33, pp. 79-123). New York: Academic Press.[pdf]

    McNeil, N. M. & Alibali, M. W. (2005b). Why won’t you change your mind? Knowledge of operational patterns hinders learning and performance on equations. Child Development, 76, 883-899.[pdf]

    McNeil, N. M. & Alibali, M. W. (2005a). Knowledge change as a function of mathematics experience: All contexts are not created equal. Journal of Cognition & Development, 6, 285-306.[pdf]

    Knuth, E. J., Alibali, M. W., McNeil, N. M., Weinberg, A., & Stephens, A. C. (2005). Middle school students’ understanding of core algebraic concepts: Equality and variable. Zentralblatt für Didaktik der Mathematik / International Journal on Mathematics Education, 37, 68-76.[pdf]

    Reprinted (2011) in Early algebraization: A global dialogue from multiple perspectives (J. Cai & E. J. Knuth, Eds.). Berlin: Springer Verlag.

    McNeil, N. M. & Alibali, M. W. (2004). You’ll see what you mean: Students encode equations based on their knowledge of arithmetic. Cognitive Science, 28, 451-466.[pdf]

    Valenzeno, L., Alibali, M. W., & Klatzky, R. L. (2003). Teachers’ gestures facilitate students’ learning: A lesson in symmetry. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 28, 187-204.[pdf]

    Alibali, M. W. (2002). Mathematical processes. In L. Nadel (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. London: Nature Publishing Group, Macmillan.

    Goldin-Meadow, S. & Alibali, M. W. (2002). Looking at the hands through time: A microgenetic perspective on learning and instruction. In N. Granott & J. Parziale (Eds.), Microdevelopment: Transition processes in development and learning. (pp. 80-105). Cambridge University Press.

    Nathan, M. J., Long, S. D., & Alibali, M. W. (2002). Symbol precedence in mathematics textbooks: A corpus analysis. Discourse Processes, 33, 1-21.[pdf]

    Alibali, M. W., Heath, D. C., & Myers, H. J. (2001). Effects of visibility between speaker and listener on gesture production: Some gestures are meant to be seen. Journal of Memory & Language, 44, 169-188.[pdf]

    Alibali, M. W. & Don, L. S. (2001). Children’s gestures are meant to be seen. Gesture, 1, 113-127.[pdf]

    Rittle-Johnson, B., Siegler, R. S., & Alibali, M. W. (2001). Developing conceptual understanding and procedural skill in mathematics: An iterative process. Journal of Educational Psychology, 93, 346-362.[pdf]

    Evans, J. L., Alibali, M. W., & McNeil, N. M. (2001). Divergence of embodied knowledge and verbal expression: Evidence from gesture and speech in children with Specific Language Impairment. Language & Cognitive Processes, 16, 309-331.[pdf]

    Alibali, M. W., Kita, S., & Young, A. (2000). Gesture and the process of speech production: We think, therefore we gesture. Language & Cognitive Processes, 15, 593-613.[pdf]

    McNeil, N. M. & Alibali, M. W. (2000). Learning mathematics from procedural instruction: Externally imposed goals influence what is learned. Journal of Educational Psychology, 92, 734-744.[pdf]

    McNeil, N. M., Alibali, M. W., & Evans, J. L. (2000). The role of gesture in children’s comprehension of spoken language: Now they need it, now they don’t. Journal of Nonverbal Behavior, 24, 131-150.[pdf]

    Haverty, L. A., Koedinger, K. R., Klahr, D., & Alibali, M. W. (2000). Solving induction problems in mathematics: Not-so-trivial PURSUIT. Cognitive Science, 24, 249-298.[pdf]

    Alibali, M. W., & DiRusso, A. A. (1999). The function of gesture in learning to count: More than keeping track. Cognitive Development, 14, 37-56.[pdf]

    Alibali, M. W., Bassok, M., Solomon, K. O., Syc, S. E., & Goldin-Meadow, S. (1999). Illuminating mental representations through speech and gesture. Psychological Science, 10, 327-333.[pdf]

    Rittle-Johnson, B., & Alibali, M. W. (1999). Conceptual and procedural knowledge of mathematics: Does one lead to the other? Journal of Educational Psychology, 91, 175-189.[pdf]

    Alibali, M. W. (1999). How children change their minds: Strategy change can be gradual or abrupt. Developmental Psychology, 35, 127-145.[pdf]

    Garber, P., Alibali, M. W., & Goldin-Meadow, S. (1998). Knowledge conveyed in gesture is not tied to the hands. Child Development, 69, 75-84.[pdf]

    Alibali, M. W., Flevares, L., & Goldin-Meadow, S. (1997). Assessing knowledge conveyed in gesture: Do teachers have the upper hand? Journal of Educational Psychology, 89, 183-193.[pdf]

    Goldin-Meadow, S., & Alibali, M. W. (1995). Mechanisms of transition: Learning with a helping hand. In D. Medin (Ed.), The psychology of learning and motivation, Vol. 33 (pp. 117-157). New York: Academic Press.

    Goldin-Meadow, S., Alibali, M. W., & Church, R. B. (1993). Transitions in concept acquisition: Using the hand to read the mind. Psychological Review, 100, 279-297.[pdf]

    Alibali, M. W., & Goldin-Meadow, S. (1993). Gesture-speech mismatch and mechanisms of learning: What the hands reveal about a child’s state of mind. Cognitive Psychology, 25, 468-523.[pdf]